Tag Archive | Friendship

ENOUGH IS ENOUGH: SOMETIMES IT’S JUST ONE THING

“What you manage to do today will be enough.” ~ Kate Allan

This quote reminds me of a lesson I learned from a woman with whom I once shared a car service ride from Sedona, AZ to Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix.

I like to strike up conversations with so-called strangers and see how long it takes for us to feel the friendship that seems to have always been there for us. Do you know what I mean?*

I learned a lot from that particular woman and think of her often. The main take-away was: Don’t overdo. Don’t put so many things on your To-Do List that you never complete them that day so some are carried over to the next day and the next and the next.

As a result of suffering serious consequences from intense over-doing, she learned to write just one thing in the big box for each day on her desk calendar. She liked seeing space around each To-Do. It made her feel spacious inside herself and outside in her life. She usually did more than that one thing, but the commitment to just one thing each day changed her life and how she lived it, making her healthier and happier.

Maybe you feel you don’t have enough to do now, in the midst of this pandemic.

But I hope we’ll each find our own healthy “enough” while taking good care during this time of uncertainties, changes, and challenges.

If, during this time, you have made an adjustment that’s helped your well-being, I encourage you to share your motivational words in a comment here. Thank you!

In the meantime, take care!

With love,
Charlene

* No matter who you are or where you are, I believe this long-term friendship sensation would happen for us too. It already exists for some of us. If you would like to join a virtual gathering to connect with me and others from this group, watch for posts inviting you to a virtual garden party. More information about gatherings in the garden will follow this.

THE FOURTH GIFT IS COMPASSION. May you be gentle with yourself and others… – from The Twelve Gifts of Birth

A “FAITH IN HUMANITY” STORY OF COMPASSION, HOPE, AND JOY

 

On September 10th, an unusual ad appeared in a Houston newspaper. The ad is actually a letter from the people of New Orleans to the people of Houston. The message, a moving and powerful one, demonstrates the best in humanity, including its beauty. Our beauty.

 

Please read the letter below. What thoughts, feelings, and ideas does it stir in you? Post your comments on the contact page here on my website or write to me at CharleneCostanzo@gmail.com.

 

“To our friends in Texas,

Twelve years ago, you took in hundreds of thousands of us. You opened your homes, closets, and kitchens. You found schools for our kids and jobs to tide us over. Some of us are still there. And when the rest of the world told us not to rebuild, you told us not to listen. Keep our city and traditions alive.

Now, no two storms are the same. Comparing rising waters is a waste of energy when you need it most. But know this — in our darkest hour, we found peace and a scorching, bright light of hope with our friends in Texas. And we hope you’ll find the same in us.

Our doors are open. Our clothes come in every size. There’s hot food on the stove, and our cabinets are well-stocked. We promise to always share what we have.

Soon, home will feel like home again, even if it seems like a lifetime away. We’ll be battling for football recruits under the Friday night lights. You’ll tell us to stop trying to barbeque. We’ll tell you to lay off your crawfish boil and come have the real thing. But for as long as you need, we’re here to help.

The way of life you love the most will carry on. You taught us that. Your courage and care continues to inspire our whole city. We couldn’t be more proud to call you our neighbors, our friends, and our family. Texas forever.

We’re with you,
New Orleans”

(from the Houston Chronicle)

As I read it again, I tear, again. But they are happy tears. My faith in humanity is strengthened. You and I can act with this level of compassion and reverence for others, day in and day out, in times of calamity and times of calm, always. We have the capacity for this. And the courage. We can respond with loving care and respect no matter how others behave. Does this seem wise or foolish to you? Realistic, idealistic, or unrealistic? I’d love to hear from you!

Charlene