Tag Archive | inner resources

FAITH IS LIKE A SAFETY NET

Purple stained cloth and glass

I had just written my “Today’s Touchstone” message for tomorrow about faith being like a safety net.

 

I made a Berry Smoothie and then slipped on a drop of water on the kitchen floor.

 

The  amazing thing is: I felt cradled on the way down to the tile.  Time slowed.  I somehow landed gently.  So did the glass.  It fell on the tile but did not break!


I wish I had thought to get a photo of the mess before my husband kindly cleaned it up. The deep purple drink splattered everywhere. Here’s a photo of that glass next to a formerly-white washcloth after repeated rinsing.

One sip of the drink remained in the glass. It was delicious.

 

What was more delicious was experiencing a sense of safety and being cared for, even during and after the fall, especially in light of what I had just written to share with others:

 

“Parachutes weren’t proven trustworthy
by having people carry them around on their backs.
The device showed its reliability once someone jumped.”
– Mary Manin Morrissey

 

Are you facing anything now that calls for a leap of faith?
Continue reading

DO YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE TALENT?

Talent Tree

Many of us hold a limited and limiting definition of talent, believing talent to mean special skill in art, athletics and academics. This narrow understanding can restrict learning ability, performance, and happiness in all aspects of life.

 

During 1999-2000, I visited classrooms in a variety of school settings throughout America, where I read my book, The Twelve Gifts of Birth. I then engaged the children in discussion about their inner resources of strength, compassion, beauty, and other human capacities, including the gift of talent.

 

Everywhere I went, I asked children to tell me about their gift of talent. In every classroom, hands shot up, and I got answers like, “I can draw.  I can sing. I’m good at baseball. I’m good at swimming. I’m good at math. I’m good at spelling.”

 

In nearly every classroom, there were a few students who hesitated to name a talent or did not did claim one at all.

 

Next, I asked, “What do you love to do? What makes you happy?”

 

Then, every child showed eagerness and enthusiasm. And, I heard answers like, “I’m good at taking care of my baby brother; I can make people laugh; I’m good at putting puzzles together; I like to look at the stars; I know sign language; I love my dog; I can twirl my tongue; I can put my legs behind my head!”

 

These answers demonstrate that, by approaching talent in a broader way and asking about likes and abilities, children readily begin to see the notion of talent in a broader way and they see themselves as “talented,” which usually leads to an increased sense of value, self-worth, and potential for learning.

 

Whenever I lead this expanded activity, I observe what appears to be heightened happiness and a greater sense of respect for self and others.

 

So, I’m suggesting three ideas to help expand the limited, common view of talent that is prevalent in our culture:

 

1.  Let’s start using a new word: Talentry.  The word talent is well established as primarily related to the 3 A’s… academics, athletics, and the arts. It is probably easier to use a new word than to try to expand the meaning of an existing one. Talentry could be that word, meaning “the mix of abilities and interests that exist in any and every human’s makeup.”

 

2. I invite you to make a Talent Tree. Start with a blank “Talent Tree” for yourself and one for each person doing this activity, if you are doing this with others. You can draw your own trees with a simple trunk and straight lines for branches. Use the one provided here as an example. The idea is to fill in the branches, one-by-one, with aspects of a person’s own, unique talentry. Brainstorm. What comes easy? What brings joy? What do you love to do? What do you care about? These are the clues for aspects of one’s talentry. Note everything that comes up. Have fun with this. The purpose is to expand appreciation of all our traits, not judge anything as “unimportant.” Nothing is too small in this quest. The sample “Talent Tree” in process here is meant to be a guide.

 

3. Fill in as many branches as you can. Then, be on the look-out.  Make it a game. Continue to add all those seemingly small qualities and interests to your Talent Tree.

 

I believe that when we all get this expanded view of talent … when we see that every person has and IS a unique expression of talentry … we will all begin to experience more reverence and joy in our hearts as well as greater success in the world.

 

SEDONA’S COFFEE POT ROCK…AND FAITH


 

When I wake in Sedona and look out from my bed, I can readily see the formation known as Coffee Pot Rock.”

 

Like many of Sedona’s Red Rocks, this one is named for what it resembles.

Can you see what looks like an old-style, percolating coffee pot at the far-right end of the elevated range? (You may need to use your gift of Imagination.)

 

Recently, when I woke, Coffee Pot Rock was not there!

 

At least it appeared to “not be there” because a heavy fog rested right on the tree tops and covered the entire rock range. (Notice the seeming “absence” of the Red Rocks in the second photo.)

 

In a few hours, the vapor lifted, and I could once again plainly see the Red Rocks.

 

Meanwhile, while the rocks remained hidden from view, I was reminded of how our inner gifts can seem to be absent.

 

In fact, it was a morning when I felt empty of Joy.

 

I saw this illusion of the rocks missing, along with knowing that the giant formations were indeed present, as a symbol of Faith, which led to feeling of gratitude and on to a stirring of Joy.

 

Anytime we experience the “absence” of Joy or Love or Faith… any of our inner resources… we can remember that that experience is an illusion… like the missing rocks.

 

Just like the Red Rocks existing, as they have, for millions of years,

the gifts of Life exist in us, always.

 

Consider letting this be a symbol of Faith for you, too.