Tag Archive | Gratitude for Life

GRATEFUL TO BE

facing the sea

 

 

 

“I’m grateful to be in this world.”
~ Alexis Giordano

 

Who is Alexis Giordano? My 5-year-old granddaughter. She said this at the dinner table during a recent family reunion.

 

After praying, “God is great. God is good. Let us thank him for our food,” we each took a turn asking for a blessing or expressing a gratitude.

 

Alexis’ addition surprised us all and left us silent for a moment. This morning, as I recall what she said and how she said it, I am again a bit stunned and stirred.

How often am I grateful simply to be in this world? Simply to be?

How often are you?
How are you feeling about being in this world today?

Along with the words of a 5-year-old child, let’s be stirred by a portion of the often-quoted poem, Desiderata:

“…whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy.”

With peace in our souls, may we be grateful to be in this world.

(God bless all the animals in the world too…as twin brother Anthony added.)

 

APPRECIATING ALL THE FLAVORS OF LIFE

Slice of lemon pie

 

 

“If life were predictable, it would…be without flavor.”                               
                                          ~ Eleanor Roosevelt

 

Yesterday I was looking for a quote about flavor because I wanted to share something about it today.

For many years, during my morning “start the day ritual,” I have read a certain affirmation which begins “With wonder and joy I am dancing with Spirit and tasting the sweetness of life…”
Yesterday I got the message in my mind and heart that life has many more flavors that sweetness and it would help if I would accept, respect, and appreciate them all.

What do I mean by this?
During a healing stay at the Chopra Center in 2000 when I faced cancer, I learned about the Ayurvedic approach to eating and healing.

According to Ayurvedic teaching, it is healthy and wise – and tasty too – to include in every meal the flavors of sweet, sour, salty, bitter, pungent, and astringent.

There is certainly something good about this mix of flavors in cooking and eating, yes?

So perhaps we can shift from judging certain “flavors” of life as unpleasant or even bad and welcome – and even savor – them all in our daily experience.

Hmm. To what gift does this reflection most relate? Imagination? Let’s imagine life as a wondrous feast today and appreciate that we have been invited.

Love and blessings for your day!

THERE ARE NO ORDINARY MOMENTS

In the Oscar-winning film, Titanic, steerage-class character Jack Dawson dines in first-class with some of the world’s wealthiest movers and shakers. When he is asked about how he makes his way in the world, in light of his poor social and financial standing, he makes it clear that he sees his life as rich. He explains that he has all that he needs within himself and with what is at hand, namely: his art supplies and the surroundings of each moment.

“I figure life’s a gift and I don’t intend on wasting it,” says Dawson, and he commits to making each day count.



          

Dawson’s perspective reminds me of my brother, Keith, and his particular way of “making each day count.”

About 5 years ago, Keith started what he calls his “photo of the day” practice.  It began when Keith had an epiphany experience–one that we all have when we realize that much time has passed in our lives.

SAMSUNGThat wake-up experience led Keith to take one photo each day, in a certain way. His intention was to pause, savor a moment, and honor it by recording it. While some of his photos capture sunsets, record his garden in bloom, and show his dogs at play, many are reminders of seemingly mundane moments: a sunny-side egg frying in a pan, a just-poured glass of beer, water flowing from the shower head.

“It’s not about waiting for peak experiences or the high-points each day,” says Keith. “I just want to stop and appreciate ordinary moments.”

He explains that, now and then, he really “gets it” that there are no ordinary moments. They’re all magnificent.

Deep down we all know this. But we forget.

May we become better and better at remembering.  

NO MATTER WHAT WE FACE TODAY, WE CAN SEE BEAUTY

dead tree lying downIn 1943, at age 29, Etty Hillesum was sent with her family to the gas chambers at Auschwitz. Like Anne Frank, Etty kept a diary. In it, she writes about the beauty she sees and the compassion she feels for humanity.

 

I like to hold in my mind an image of Etty as she describes herself “standing in some corner of the camp, my feet planted on earth, my eyes raised towards heaven, tears running down my face, tears of deep emotion and gratitude.”

 

Gratitude! This young woman is living in a death camp and expressing gratitude for the beauty she sees.

 

In my mind’s eye, I try to picture young Etty–malnourished, perhaps abused and bruised–and yet appreciating the goodness and beauty of life. In my imagination, I stand by her side, and I wonder: What might she be appreciating in the moment? Is it something in nature? Does she see a purple wildflower pushing its way through parched soil? Has she spotted a deer in the distance? Has she heard the lilting call of a bird to its mate? Might the formation of clouds in the sky above offer a lovely sight to behold? Or, might a happy memory be uplifting her?

 

Any or all of those things, at times, may have stirred gratitude and joy in Etty’s heart. However, I sense in her a capacity and a commitment to seeing beauty, and expressing beauty, no matter what. In fact, she also wrote, “I know what may lie in wait for us…And yet I find life beautiful and meaningful.”

 

Etty’s perspective leads me to think: “Surely, no matter what I face today, I too can find life beautiful.”

 

                (From TOUCHSTONES: STORIES FOR LIVING THE TWELVE GIFTS)